Harmonics Book

This book clarifies harmonic (flageolet) production on the double bass in general, and specifically provides materials towards developing facility with various pizzicato harmonic techniques which have not been thoroughly explored in pedagogical materials. The techniques explored have applications in contexts from solo to ensemble playing across idioms and provide an entry way to further exploration for the curious bassist.

Bells Plucked From Air Book

To order multiple copies, please place an order on bandcamp or contact me by email.

Topics:
Harmonic Series
Cent Deviation
Practicality / Locations
Dual Node Harmonics
False Harmonics
Technical Considerations
Harp Harmonics
Right Hand Dexterity
Tetrachords
Arpeggios & Scales
Diego Ortiz - Recercada 2
Partial Alternating Exercise
Collapsing Scale
Interval Options
Kyle Motl - Spiral Study
Scarlatti - Sonata K. 34
Pizzicato Artifical Multiphonics
2 Handed Harp Harmonics
Learning Polyrhythms
Kyle Motl - Scintillious

excerpts from:
Caroline L Miller: Hydra Nightingale
Tobin Chodos: Trickle Town
Treesearch

“Kyle Motl’s Bells Plucked From Air, a guide to (mostly) pizzicato harmonic techniques for the double bass is an elegant book by an expert in the field of solo contemporary double bass crossing composed and improvised musics. 

Filled with insightful explanations about the overtone series, notation and (most importantly) how to play harmonics is just the beginning of what the book offers. The following chapters delve into related harmonic techniques, all presented logically, sequentially, and grounded in musicianship studies. The text is supported by useful photographs and clear graphics.  

In addition, he has included transcriptions of early and baroque music as well as original works, all well suited for a recital program. Kyle Motl’s perspective is both detailed and open. He invites the reader to engage, invent and transform the materials into one’s own. Bells Plucked From Air is a significant contribution to the literature from an original thinker and innovative player.”

Mark Dresser
Distinguished Professor of Music
UC San Diego